National Geographic®

Mystery Voyage Game

Rules

 

Imagine that you've been magically transported to a mystery destination somewhere on Earth.  You look at your new surroundings, then search for clues.  As the evidence mounts up, you narrow down your choices until you solve the mystery, figure out where you are... and win the game!

 

Object

 

To be first to correctly identify which country you are visiting.  In the U.S., you will need to figure out which state you are visiting (beware:  the U.S. is a correct answer for one of the countries!).

 

Contents

 



 

Set Up

 

1.  Before playing for the first time, separate the cards into three decks:  Clue Cards (yellow backs), Mystery Cards (black backs), and Picture Cards.  (The Picture Cards have the answers on the back, so don't peek!)  Place the Picture Cards and Clue Cards into one side of the plastic tray; place the Mystery Cards into the other side.  Remove the last four cards from the Mystery Card deck—they are not used to play the game.

 

Each set of Mystery Voyage cards is numbered; make sure that the Clue Cards, Mystery Cards, and Picture Cards show the same number here.

 

2.  Take the first Picture Card (it has the number 1 on the side with the picture), and place it, with the picture face up, on Start.

 

3.  Take the first four Clue Cards (they will have the numbers 1, 21, 41 on the side that reads "Clue Card") and place them, with the words "Clue Card" face up, on the yellow-framed picture spaces on the game board.

 

4.  Take the first four Mystery Cards (they will have the numbers 1, 21, 41 on the side that reads "Mystery Card") and place them, with the words, "Mystery Card" face up, on the black-framed picture spaces on the game board.

 

5.  Each player chooses a writing slate, a pencil, and a playing piece.  Players look at the Picture Card on the Start space, then place their playing pieces on top of the Picture Card.

 

Starting the Game

 

1.  The youngest player goes first.  Play passes to the left.

 

2.  Players take turns rolling the dice and moving.  Players may move up to the number of spaces shown on the dice.

 

3.  Players may not move onto or through the same space twice in one turn.

 

Landing on Clue Card Spaces

 

1.  When a player lands on a space with a Clue Card, he picks up that card and looks at it.

 

2.  Each Clue Card and Mystery Card has three numbered clues on it.  Players only use the clue with the number that corresponds to the number of the Picture Card on the board.

 

For example, use clue #18 when you use Picture Card #18, clue #38 when you use Picture Card #38, and clue #58 when you use Picture Card #58.

 

3.  After looking at the clue, the player passes that Clue Card to all other players who are on the brick path or the railroad tracks. 

 

4.  After the last player on the brick path or railroad tracks has seen the Clue Card, he puts the card back on its space on the board, with the words "Clue Card" face up.

 

Landing on Mystery Card Spaces

 

1.  When a player lands on a space with a Mystery Card, he picks up that card and looks at it.

 

2.  As with Clue Cards, players only use the clue with the number that corresponds to the number of the Picture Card on the board.

 

3.  After looking at the clue on a Mystery Card, the player puts the card back on its space on the board, with the words "Mystery Card" face up.

 

4.  Players do not show Mystery Cards to other players.

 

Writing Slates

 

1.  Players may use their writing slates to make notes and copy clues.

 

Landing on Another Player's Piece

 

1.  When a player lands on a space already occupied by another player, the player who already occupies the space must reveal one clue that he has seen (either by whispering it or by writing it on his writing slate and showing it to the other player).  For example, Player 1 lands on the space that has Player 2's player piece.  Player 2 must reveal one clue to Player 1.

 

Guessing a Mystery Destination

 

1.  Instead of moving, a player may guess the mystery destination on his turn.  To guess, a player names a country or a U.S. state.  The player may guess the U.S. as a country—it appears as one of the countries in the game. 

 

2.  After guessing, a player picks up the Picture Card on the board and looks at the answer on the back without showing any other players.

 

3.  If a player guesses correctly, he wins the game.  If a player guesses incorrectly, s/he is out of the game and play continues.  If a player guesses the U.S. and the answer is a U.S. state, his guess is incorrect.

 

Playing Another Game

 

1.  To start another game, remove the Clue Cards.  Mystery Cards, and Picture Card from the board.  The Clue Cards and Mystery Cards will be used for future mystery voyages, so keep each set together.  Place each set in the plastic tray at the back of its respective deck.

 

2.  The mystery voyages are meant to be played in order, from #1 to #60.  Follow the set up instructions above, using a new set of cards.

 

3.  Pick the next Picture Card, then take the Clue Cards and Mystery Cards that go with it.  Make sure that you use a full set of matching Clue Cards (4 cards make up a set) and Mystery Cards (4 cards) each time that you play.  To make sure that the cards match, look at the numbers on the side that reads "Clue Card" and "Mystery Card"—the numbers on the Clue Cards should be the same as the numbers on the Mystery Cards.  One of these three numbers will match the number on the Picture Card.  (For example, when using Picture Card #32, use the Clue Cards and Mystery Cards that read "12, 32, 52.")  Please note that the Clue Cards and Mystery Cards will be used again (these cards have clues for three different mystery voyages on them).

 

4.  When playing the game, refer to the clues that match the number on the Picture Card.  For example, when using Picture Card #32 use the clues numbered 32.

 

Using a Map or Globe

 

To make this game challenging for players of all ages and levels of knowledge, we purposely did not print the names of countries and cities on the game board.  When playing with children, however, adult players may wish to allow young players to consult a world map or globe as they play.

 

 

© 1997 University Games